Mooting

Overview

Two teams of two barristers and an optional third solicitor go head to head in addressing a legal problem. They must conduct research into a particular field, use the facts and case law to create arguments, and then present these arguments in front of a judge. These competitions test competitors’ research, speaking and writing skills, and are highly recommended for any and all law students whether they seek to work in advocacy or not.

If you are looking for some advice on mooting please view our mooting workshop here.

General Moot

The General Moot contains both a Senior and Junior Division. The Junior Division is open to all students who haven’t completed Property B, and will involve a problem on an area of law that students learn early on in their degree, such as Criminal law or Contracts law. The Senior Division is more difficult, designed for students nearing the end of their degree, with a problem that can be drawn from any law subject.

The General Moot is one of our most popular competitions and for good reason – it’s a great opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, and put into practice what you learn in class.

First Year Moot

Mooting can seem like an intimidating, difficult experience, especially for students who haven’t competed in one before. That’s why we also run a First Year Moot – designed exclusively for First Year students. The moot problem will be on either Criminal Law or Tort Law – both subjects that students are taught in their first year. The First Year Moot is a great introduction to Mooting (and competitions in general), and is highly recommended for all first years, whether you’re considering a career in advocacy or not.

International Humanitarian Moot

This competition is designed for students interested in International Law. This Moot is set in an International Court, often defending or prosecuting people accused of serious offences, including war crimes. While this Moot can be challenging, and requires a large amount of research into International law and precedent, it is a great opportunity for students to learn more about an area of law they may not know much about.